The Whitehill Report on Professional and Public Education for Historic Preservation
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The Whitehill Report on Professional and Public Education for Historic Preservation

The Whitehill Report on Professional and Public Education for Historic Preservation was submitted 15 April 1968 to the Trustees of the National Trust for Historic Preservation by the Committee on Professional and Public Education for Historic Preservation, Walter Muir Whitehill, Chairman. Note: This copy of the Report was scanned from a manuscript provided by John Fugelso of the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.  It is used with permission of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.


Introduction 
In January 1967 the Chairman of the National Trust for Historic Preservation appointed a Committee on Professional and Public Education for Historic Preservation and Restoration consisting of: 

Walter Muir Whitehill, Director and Librarian of the Boston Athenaeum, Chairman 
Francis L. Berkeley, Jr., Assistant to the President, University of Virginia, Vice Chairman 
John Otis Brew, Director, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University 
Leonard Carmichael, Vice President for Research and Exploration, National Geographic Society (former President of Tufts University and Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution) 
John Peterson Elder, Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University 
Ronald F. Lee, Special Assistant to the Director, National Park Service 
Ralph G. Schwarz, Director of Operations, Ford Foundation 
Charles van Ravenswaay, Director, Henry Francis du Pont Winterthur Museum 

Of the, committee, half (Messrs. Whitehill, Carmichael, Lee, and van Ravenswaay) were Trustees of the National Trust

Aided by a grant from the Ford Foundation, the committee spent some five months upon its investigation. William G. Wing of Englewood, New Jersey, an experienced journalist (formerly on the New York Herald Tribune) who has long been concerned with the conservation of natural areas, was engaged to do the necessary staff work for the committee. 

The committee met at the Boston Athenaeum on 3-4 February, at Winterthur on 26-27 February, at Williamsburg (by invitation of Carlisle H. Humelsine, president of Colonial Williamsburg) on 5-7 May, and in New York City on 9 June. Messrs. Berkeley, Brew and Elder were appointed as a Sub-Committee on Architectural Curricula, and Messrs. van Ravenswaay and Lee as a Sub-Committee on the Conservation of the Traditional Building Crafts. Both sub-committees met on various occasions in New York, Charlottesville, and elsewhere. Mr. Wing traveled throughout the United States, visiting architectural schools and preservation organizations to gather information required by the committee and report opinions obtained during his visits. The committee is indebted to Mr. Wing for his willingness to undertake this assignment on the shortest of notice, and for the efficient manner in which he carried out much of the fact-finding involved in the committee's work. The Chairman, Hon. Gordon Gray, and former Executive Director, Robert R. Garvey, of the National Trust were unfailingly helpful to the committee. By invitation, they attended its four formal meetings, and throughout the period of its investigation assisted in every way possible. By assigning Mrs. Jane Coughlin to act as secretary to Mr. Wing at the National Trust Headquarters, they made it possible for the widely scattered members of the committee to keep abreast of each other's activities and investigations. 

Although the original investigative mission of the committee was completed in June 1967, its members were glad to comply with the request of the Executive Committee of the National Trust, made at its meeting on 12 June 1967, that they continue in being as a permanent Standing Committee of Professional Consultants. 

The report that follows was, in slightly different form, approved by the Trustees of the National Trust at the annual meeting in St. Louis on 19 October 1967. Since he assumed the presidency of the National Trust in January 1968, James Biddle has worked closely with the committee which met in New York City on 6 February 1968 with representatives of Columbia University, Cornell University and the University of Virginia to discuss proposals made by these institutions for the possible establishment of graduate programs in historic preservation. Although the committee is still working to perfect feasible specific programs for which the National Trust might seek financial support, the report is now published as a statement of purpose and direction for the activities of the National Trust in professional and public education. 

The findings and recommendations of the two sub-committees are given in substantially the form in which they were submitted by their chairmen, Messrs. Berkeley and van Ravenswaay.  

Walter Muir Whitehill

Boston Athenaeum
15 April 1968


Introduction

I.  Professional Education for Preservation and Restoration

    A.  Architectural Curricula

    B.  Conservation of the Traditional Building Crafts

II.  Public Education for Historic Preservation and Restoration

III.  Publications


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